Legal

Legal eagles protect forest habitat

Monday, May 2, 2016

Originally published at: 

Our forests are under pressure. Victoria is the most cleared state in Australia, so the forests left there are crucial habitat for wildlife like the greater glider and yellow-bellied glider. New species are still being discovered in our forests, such as the East Gippsland Galaxias fish. That makes it all the more shocking that state logging agency VicForests doesn't do what the law requires them to when it comes to checking for threatened species in areas slated for logging.

Danya Jacobs is Environmental Justice Australia's Forest Defence Lawyer. She uses her legal skills to defend patches of forest that might otherwise be lost to logging. From last-minute injunctions to educating citizen scientists so their evidence is courtroom quality, Danya has a wealth of legal experience and a passion for forests. Danya will be sharing the story of our forest defence work and the challenges she works to overcome at a Forest Briefing.

Stopping the Chopping: forest defence in Victoria

Sunday, December 20, 2015

Originally published at: 

The forests of East Gippsland, Victoria, continue to fall victim to an over-subsidised and under-regulated forestry industry. While some threatened species of flora and fauna should enjoy legal protection, the regulations are too-often ignored in the quest to make a dollar out of an unsustainable plunder. Thankfully, there are people on the ground to defend the forest and get in the way of the machines if need be. A powerful combination of legal action and direct protest have catalysed a recent win for the forests on the St Patrick's River, East Gippsland.

Guests:

Jill Redwood - Environment East Gippsland

Ed Hill - Goongerah Environment Centre

Image: logging halted on Tuesday 15th December, 2015. The machines were soon withdrawn from the area.

- See more at: http://www.3cr.org.au/earthmatters/episode-201512201100/stopping-choppin...

The forests of East Gippsland, Victoria, continue to fall victim to an over-subsidised and under-regulated forestry industry. While some threatened species of flora and fauna should enjoy legal protection, the regulations are too-often ignored in the quest to make a dollar out of an unsustainable plunder. Thankfully, there are people on the ground to defend the forest and get in the way of the machines if need be. A powerful combination of legal action and direct protest have catalysed a recent win for the forests on the St Patrick's River, East Gippsland.

Guests:

Jill Redwood - Environment East Gippsland

Ed Hill - Goongerah Environment Centre

Image: logging halted on Tuesday 15th December, 2015. The machines were soon withdrawn from the area.

- See more at: http://www.3cr.org.au/earthmatters/episode-201512201100/stopping-choppin...

The forests of East Gippsland, Victoria, continue to fall victim to an over-subsidised and under-regulated forestry industry. While some threatened species of flora and fauna should enjoy legal protection, the regulations are too-often ignored in the quest to make a dollar out of an unsustainable plunder. Thankfully, there are people on the ground to defend the forest and get in the way of the machines if need be. A powerful combination of legal action and direct protest have catalysed a recent win for the forests on the St Patrick's River, East Gippsland.

Guests:

Jill Redwood - Environment East Gippsland

Ed Hill - Goongerah Environment Centre

Image: logging halted on Tuesday 15th December, 2015. The machines were soon withdrawn from the area.

- See more at: http://www.3cr.org.au/earthmatters/episode-201512201100/stopping-choppin...

East Gippsland Logging halted on Tuesday 15th December, 2015Logging halted on Tuesday 15th December, 2015. The machines were soon withdrawn from the area.

The forests of East Gippsland, Victoria, continue to fall victim to an over-subsidised and under-regulated forestry industry. While some threatened species of flora and fauna should enjoy legal protection, the regulations are too-often ignored in the quest to make a dollar out of an unsustainable plunder. Thankfully, there are people on the ground to defend the forest and get in the way of the machines if need be. A powerful combination of legal action and direct protest have catalysed a recent win for the forests on the St Patrick's River, East Gippsland.

We quibble over ‘lawfare’, but the law is not protecting species properly anyway

Thursday, November 19, 2015

Originally published at: 

The federal government is set to go ahead with its crackdown on environmental “lawfare”, which would restrict green groups' legal standing to challenge mining approvals and other developments.

The Senate Standing Committee on Environment and Communications yesterday endorsed the proposed changes to the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act, citing the “costs to proponents and consequences for economic activity when major development projects are delayed by judicial review”.

Abbott Government’s attack on the environment

Wednesday, August 19, 2015

Ashton coal mine Hunter Valley AustraliaUPDATE: 19th September 2015 Malcolm Turnbull has postponed the planned changes to the law that would exclude most enviro groups from challenging bad government development decisions.

The Abbott Government’s attack on the environment knows no bounds and is reaching a peak that has even the most conservative minds staggering with disbelief! His coal-obsession has become a very obvious mental disorder.

Farm groups furious at Coalition move to restrict environmental challenges

Wednesday, August 19, 2015

Originally published at: 

Farm organisations horrified they will be swept up in changes to environmental laws that aim to stop green groups taking legal action against resource projects

Angry farm organisations have learned they will be caught by changes to federal environmental laws aimed at stopping “environmental saboteurs” using the courts to delay big projects, but agriculture minister Barnaby Joyce says some individual farmers may not.

After the surprise announcement of major changes to federal environmental law on Tuesday, the Abbott government spent much of Wednesday making conflicting statements about which part of the laws it intended to abolish.

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