Regional Forest Agreements

Abolish Failed Forest Deals – What do the Parties Say?

Thursday, June 23, 2016

For nearly 20 years, Regional Forest Agreements (RFAs) have given the logging industry preferential access to around seven million hectares of publicly owned native forests in four states. Logging has been exempted from Federal environment laws for this time. AFCA together with over 30 environment groups say RFAs should be abolished and logging in native forests should end.

AFCA asked the Parties two questions. Here are their replies (at 23 June 2016):

Call To End Special Treatment For The Logging Industry

Thursday, May 19, 2016

Originally published at: 

Victorian conservationists who’ve saved a colony of threatened Greater Gliders from loggers say the latest victory is further evidence the Federal Government should tear up the Regional Forestry Agreements, which exempt native forest logging from national environmental law.

Abolish Failed Forest Deals

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

For nearly 20 years native forest logging in Victoria, Tasmania, NSW and WA has received special treatment under commonwealth environmental laws. Other industries need approval from the commonwealth Environment Minister before taking an action that may affect threatened species or World Heritage. Native forest logging does not. The result has been catastrophic for wildlife and other forest values.

RFA’s – just a giant legal loophole to destroy forests

Friday, May 13, 2016

700 pages and not one reason to keep logging forestsEast Gippsland was the first region to have its forests signed away under the appalling logging industry ‘free-for-all’ called the Regional Forest Agreements (RFAs). Its life of 20 years is about to expire next year and MUST NOT be rolled over for another 2 decades of legally exempt pillaging. Many reports have shown it was a massive failure for all but the export woodchip industry.

Regional Forest Agreements: Nice idea but total failure!

Friday, May 13, 2016

Originally published at: 

RFAs were designed to reduce conflict but tensions still flare up regularly. Photo: Dave Gallan

RFAs were designed to reduce conflict but tensions still flare up regularly. Photo: Dave Gallan

On Wednesday this week, the National Parks Association of NSW (NPA) launched a new report entitled Regional Forest Agreements in NSW. Have they achieved their aims? In short, the answer is no — far from it, writes Dr Oisín Sweeney.

REGIONAL FOREST Agreements (RFAs) are deals between the Commonwealth and State governments that allow for logging in public native forests.

There are ten RFAs currently active in four states: Western Australia, Victoria, Tasmania and NSW. They begin to expire from 2017 with East Gippsland and Tasmania first.

20 year legal exemption must go

Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Wednesday 3rd February marks the 19th anniversary of an agreement that has allowed the logging industry a legal exemption from Australia’s environment laws.

Jill Redwood from Environment East Gippsland, where this exemption from commonwealth laws was first introduced says the Turnbull government is planning to instate another 20 years of this special treatment.

“We have one more year before this archaic agreement expires. To continue this out-dated, anti-environmental exemption to the laws for a passé and declining industry is deplorable”.

Legally exempt extinction?

Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Our state and federal governments signed away our native forests exactly 19 years ago today (3rd Feb 1997). They were deemed exempt from commonwealth environmental laws. Ever since our forests have fed a massive overseas woodchip market.

This immunity from the law will end next year and the Turnbull Government wants to roll over this special treatment without pause or scrutiny.

Much of our wildlife is now critically endangered due to ongoing destruction of habitat. Thousands of hectares of our original rich forests have been and are still being converted to uniform single species tree crops across the country; a desert compared to the once diverse forests brimming with birds and wildlife.